Hot! Hot! Hot! 3 Recipes to Warm Your Bones During the Cold Seasons

November 30, 2018

 

 Hey there, blissmakers!  Today I’m coming to you with some practical magick that you can put to good use during the chilly months.  I’m sharing my favorite potions recipes that help keep me warm when the mercury takes a dive.  I’m not very keen on being cold so you can be sure that these recipes really bring the heat.

 

 

Use them daily, weekly, or anytime you’re feeling a chill.  I like to make big batches in advance to use throughout the week as I need them, but you can make them in individual on-demand servings, too.  Happy heating!!

 

Good Health Brew

 

One of these days I’m going to come up with a snazzier name for this little bevvie, but for now I just call it my Good Health Brew.  I’ve been making this recipe for over a decade now, and it’s seen many variations.  The lemon is alkalizing and supplies plenty of vitamin C.  The cayenne is heating and works wonders to help break down mucus and clear out the respiratory tract.  The ginger is heating and improves digestive function.  It’s quite possibly the perfect cold weather drink.  This is the recipe that I like the best, but feel free to work your own magick with it and tweak it to your preference.

 

 

In one 12 ounce mug, add the juice of one lemon, some powdered cayenne pepper*, and a peeled thumb of ginger.  If you want to sweeten it up, just add a teaspoon of maple syrup.  Fill with boiling purified water.  Steep for at least a minute, then stir, and enjoy sipping this mug of loving warmth.

 

*I like this spicy, so I use about 1/4 teaspoon of cayenne powder, but I recommend starting with a pinch and working your way up as desired.

 

Pele’s Fire Water Bath Tea

 

This is a beautiful way to add some extra heat to your bathtime.  Filled with warming herbs, it will not only heat your bones, but will smell like Christmas morning as you soak.  Win-win!

 

Herbs:

 

ginger

turmeric

clove

cinnamon

cardamom

 

Simply add the herbs (at least a tablespoon of each) into a large tea ball diffuser, or wrap them up in a cheesecloth.  You can vary the ratios per your preference.  I also recommend using the actual herb rather than a powdered version, because it will last longer and be less messy.  Either hang the tea ball/cloth from the faucet while the water runs or simply place it in the tub to steep in the water.  Aim for water that is hot, but that is cool enough that you can easily lower yourself into it.  (We aren’t trying to boil you … just give you a nice relaxing heat.)  You can let the tea steep as long as you like, and the tea can be reused two or three times before changing it out.  Now, lie back, relax, and dream of pristine tropical beaches and hot cabana boys …

 

Balinese Boreh (Deep Heat Scrub)

 

I got this recipe about a million years ago, from one of my favorite books*.  The author shares that the scrub is “a centuries-old village recipe using spices we more readily associate with curry, and is prepared to warm the body at the first sign of windy weather.”  It’s a beautiful blend of exfoliating scrub and deep heat treatment, so will leave you warm and soft and ready for anything.  

 

I have only slightly tweaked this recipe from the original.  And you’re welcome to tweak it to suit your needs and desires, as well.  Enjoy!  (NOTE:  This scrub is not suitable for pregnant women.)

 

* The Tropical Spa, by Sophie Benge

 

Ingredients:

 

4 tsp sandalwood powder (you can order online, here’s one affordable option)

2 tsp whole cloves

2 tsp ginger

1 tsp cinnamon

1 tsp coriander seeds

1-2 tsp finely ground rice

1 tsp turmeric

1 tsp nutmeg

1 tsp coconut (or other) oil

3 large carrots, grated - optional

 

Procedure:

 

  • Mix everything but the carrots together to form a paste.  (You may not need all the oil depending on your preferred consistency.)  NOTE:  If you find this to be too fiery on your skin, you can add more rice powder to dilute it.

  • Apply the paste to your body.  You can put it all over (avoid any mucus membranes, eyes, nostrils, etc.), you can apply locally to any area requiring a little extra heat and/or healing.  Leave for 5 minutes to work its fiery magick.  

  • Using brisk strokes, quickly massage the paste into your skin until it begins to dissolve and/or flake away.

  • Gently rub the grated carrot into your skin to replenish any lost moisture during the treatment.  (You can skip this step if you’d rather.)

  • Shower, and slather your body with coconut oil, shea butter, or other natural plant-based moisturizer of your choice.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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Melanie Hayes
NCLMBT #4875, E14883, CYT

Email: experiments.in.bliss@gmail.com